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28mm Prohibition Wars

28mm Prohibition Wars

 

A new project, a new genre. I had resolved not to add any thing new to my list of hobby projects for the year as I already have 4 projects that I am juggling with at the moment:
28mm WW2 Pacific for Bolt Action as my son is collecting Japanese and they need some opposition.
28mm Anglo Saxons for Saga because the gripping beast plastic dark age range is so good.
28mm Medieval skirmish because Sally 4th makes 28mm Castles so it would be would be wrong not to.
28mm Old West because I discovered Battleflag Western buildings and fell in love with them and you only need a few figures for a game.
Searching for some new western figures led me to the Old Glory UK website and their selection of miniatures from Blue Moon Manufacturing in the ‘Slice of Americana’ section. I started by ordering their Western Civilians box set which arrived promptly and the first six miniatures were painted the weekend that it arrived. As I was so impressed with the characterful sculpting of the figures I went back to order some more and got distracted by the ‘Gangland’ range. These are 28mm figures for 1920’s – 1930’s prohibition era gaming. These really caught my eye and reminded me of some figures I’d painted 30 years ago when Citadel Miniatures had produced a gangster range. To start off I did not order, but kept going back to the Old Glory web site to have another look at the figures as I knew that I really should not have a fifth project on the go! My resolve was weak, I’ve been an enthusiastic hobbyist for 30 years now, I have a mountain of unpainted lead and more recently plastic, but these had caught my attention, and it’s not like a real period like napoleonics or ancients where you need hundreds of figures painted before you can play your first game… half a dozen figures a side and your away. I dropped the box of miniatures into the on line cart, entered the number from my pocket money plastic, and the deed was done, a new period or genre has been started! 
Having ordered some miniatures, I reckoned the next thing to do was to find some rules so that I would have a game that could be played with them, half an hour on Google and I had discovered ‘Mad Dogs with Guns’ from The Virtual Armchair Generals Site. I liked the look of these for 2 reasons, firstly the rules mechanisms reminded me of ‘The Rules with No Name’ which I use for Old West gaming and really like, and secondly there is a detailed campaign game background that generates scenarios. I have not played them yet, but as they were available for purchase as a pdf download, they were delivered immediately, and they look as if they should deliver an interesting and enjoyable game. The rule book is nicely illustrated with pictures of cardstock buildings that are also sold by ‘The Virtual Armchair General’ under the product name of ‘Mean Streets’. I think it was these building kits that clinched the deal for me on starting gaming in a new period. They are works of art, and really catch the 1920s period flavour.
This series of wargames articles is going to cover assembling a city full of terrain, painting gangster miniatures and after action reports of games played in the prohibition era.

A new project, a new genre. I had resolved not to add any thing new to my list of hobby projects for the year as I already have 4 projects that I am juggling with at the moment:

28mm WW2 Pacific for Bolt Action as my son is collecting Japanese and they need some opposition.

28mm Anglo Saxons for Saga because the gripping beast plastic dark age range is so good.

28mm Medieval skirmish because Sally 4th makes 28mm Castles so it would be would be wrong not to.

28mm Old West because I discovered Battleflag Western buildings and fell in love with them and you only need a few figures for a game.

 

Searching for some new western figures led me to the Old Glory UK website and their selection of miniatures from Blue Moon Manufacturing in the ‘Slice of Americana’ section. I started by ordering their Western Civilians box set which arrived promptly and the first six miniatures were painted the weekend that it arrived. As I was so impressed with the characterful sculpting of the figures I went back to order some more and got distracted by the ‘Gangland’ range. These are 28mm figures for 1920’s – 1930’s prohibition era gaming. These really caught my eye and reminded me of some figures I’d painted 30 years ago when Citadel Miniatures had produced a gangster range. To start off I did not order, but kept going back to the Old Glory web site to have another look at the figures as I knew that I really should not have a fifth project on the go! My resolve was weak, I’ve been an enthusiastic hobbyist for 30 years now, I have a mountain of unpainted lead and more recently plastic, but these had caught my attention, and it’s not like a real period like napoleonics or ancients where you need hundreds of figures painted before you can play your first game… half a dozen figures a side and your away. I dropped the box of miniatures into the on line cart, entered the number from my pocket money plastic, and the deed was done, a new period or genre has been started! 

 

Having ordered some miniatures, I reckoned the next thing to do was to find some rules so that I would have a game that could be played with them, half an hour on Google and I had discovered ‘Mad Dogs with Guns’ from The Virtual Armchair Generals Site. I liked the look of these for 2 reasons, firstly the rules mechanisms reminded me of ‘The Rules with No Name’ which I use for Old West gaming and really like, and secondly there is a detailed campaign game background that generates scenarios. I have not played them yet, but as they were available for purchase as a pdf download, they were delivered immediately, and they look as if they should deliver an interesting and enjoyable game. The rule book is nicely illustrated with pictures of cardstock buildings that are also sold by ‘The Virtual Armchair General’ under the product name of ‘Mean Streets’. I think it was these building kits that clinched the deal for me on starting gaming in a new period. They are works of art, and really catch the 1920s period flavour.

 

This series of wargames articles is going to cover assembling a city full of terrain, painting gangster miniatures and after action reports of games played in the prohibition era.

 

28mm Prohibition Wars
28mm Prohibition Wars

City Terrain - 1st Block

City Terrain - 1st Block

1st Mean Street City Block